Patrick’s day

Mar 17, 2023

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Most people who celebrate on St. Patrick’s day today think of wearing green and enjoying good Irish music, Guinness and perhaps dancing at an Irish pub.

But it’s easy to forget that Patrick was a robust disciple of Jesus Christ who brought the Good News of the ultimate and eternal liberation through Jesus Christ to the people of Ireland.

Today’s Office of Readings gives Patrick’s own words to communicate the whole-hearted life-or-deathness of his relationship with Christ. Patrick writes:

“I am ready also to give up my life, without hesitation and most willingly, for his name. I want to spend myself in that country, even in death, if the Lord should grant me this favour. I am deeply in his debt,..” 

When something is too much for us (either too bad or too generous) we often reduce it to what we can deal with easily. So we wear green, drink Guinness and go no further, forgetting what the beer and colour is helping us to remember.

We reduce the lives of the saints (as we do many truths of faith) to ideas that we then consider to be optional beliefs and which don’t require us to leave our comforts or to face our fears.

The same reduction has happened with many other saints.

We reduce the feast of St. Francis to pet day at school or animal farm at Church. Francis would be scandalised at the reduction. While Francis did have an interesting encounter with a wolf, his primary love was not the earth and the animals!  Francis loved God, and gave his life to serving God. This decision and his life of faith placed him in relationship with the poor, the lepers, the animals and all of creation.

To diminish the life of Francis by focussing on animals or on creation is the same tragic misunderstanding as reducing Patrick to beer and music.

And then there is Valentine.  Valentine’s day has become a feast of secular romantic love. We know little about the life of this saint.  Pope Gelasius I in the fifth century named Valentine among the saints “… whose names are justly reverenced among people, but whose acts are known only to God.”    We do know that St. Valentine was a martyr. He gave his life for God.  It is reasonable to assume that Valentine is a bit upset and seeing his sacrifice remembered only in anonymous gifts of chocolate and red roses.

The reduction of the lives of these saints is the pattern of a secular world where even the feast of the Incarnation of the one true and real God is more about the mythical Santa Claus.  And the greatest feast of the passion and resurrection of our Saviour at Easter is reduced to hot cross buns and chocolate eggs.

Back to Patrick.  On the anniversary of the death of St. Patrick, let’s drink good Guinness, wear green and rollick to the Irish music. But let’s also take a moment to remember that Patrick is a forefather in faith who taught us that all the colour of dancing, beer and good music cannot begin to match the joy of living with Jesus Christ, now and forever.

Amen!

+++

FFF IN THE CAFE… Send your name and the name of a cafe or bar to john@fff.org.nz Scribble FFF on a table napkin, take a seat and wait.

DROP IN AT A GATHERING:

Monday 20 March 2023 (and every Monday)
10.00am at Moko (Kudos) in the Bush Inn Centre Christchurch (Directions) Trish

Wednesday 29 March 2023
10.30am at Cafe 28, 28 Cornwall St, Lower Hutt, (Directions) Catherine

Tuesday 11 April 2023 (and second Tuesday of every month)
10.30am at Zenders 44 Hopkins Road, Newstead, Hamilton (Directions). Christina

 

1 Comment

  1. Yes on these attractive feast days our secular
    world encourages us to find the fun in our social lives but when we dig deeper we find an enduring joy that connects us spiritually to God. The freedom this choice brings us is amazing and deeply fulfilling.

    Reply

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