July 4th

Jul 2, 2010

It is a significant weekend here in the US with celebrations of the anniversary of Independence Day. Already the campus and the town is turning red white and blue with stars and stripes.

For us at the Liturgical Institute the weekend marks the half-way point of our studies. Two of our classes finish today: Sources and Methods of Liturgical Research and The Liturgical Movement of the century before the Second Vatican Council. After this morning’s Sources and Method’s exam the community is feeling a bit weary. It was a tough exam and the in the last few days the house has been very focussed on study. Even numbers at “holy hour” decreased. I am pretty confident that I passed the exam, but I had hoped to do better than that. Next week will tell.

This afternoon I complete the final paper for the Liturgical Movement class. I am nearly there as as soon as I finish this note I will spend an hour completing the essay.

A few of us are heading into Chicago city for the weekend. It will be good to have a break from the campus environment. I will arrive back here on Sunday afternoon ready for the beginning of the second semester on Monday morning.

It will also be good to leave the computer for the weekend so there won’t be a blog from me till Monday evening NZ time.

I am amazed at the number of people who are following the blog. Thank you for your emails and responses. It is certainly helpful to me to continue to journey, reflect and pray alongside the parishioners of Chatham Islands and Our Lady of Victories.

Blessings
John

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