savouring silence

Sep 25, 2010

This afternoon I began a retreat with 38 members of a Religious community of brothers. Tonight, after dinner, we moved into the silence that will accompany us until the retreat concludes on Friday.

Later this evening I took time to savour the silence. Even for a priest and for Religious Brothers, as for most of the people I know, real silence is rare. Often there might be an absence of conversation, company or noise, but most of us, much of the time, fill this silence with noise.

How easy it is when lying awake at 2am to turn on the radio. How often do I drive without the car stereo or walk without an MP3?

The reason I reach for the radio in the car or turn on the TV when home alone in the evening, is that silence is not always comfortable. In moments of silence anything that I am not at peace about comes to consciousness. This is precisely why silence is such an important part of prayer.

When we relax into silence, we discover our present reality. This is important, since God is waiting to come to us in the joys, hopes, griefs and anxieties of every human life. If I am not aware of where and how I am, I may well miss the presence and action of God.

My human health and happiness comes not when I overcome my anxieties and griefs, but when I know that God is with me in the midst of these trials. There is no greater intimacy than the experience of the love of God carrying us through suffering.

Please keep the brothers and I in your prayer over these days.

And you might like to ‘accompany us in spirit’ by setting a few minutes each day to simply sit in silence, and to know that whatever feelings and worries come to your consciousness, you are not alone. God is with you.




0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest Posts

sabbatical update

sabbatical update

I’m like Thomas. I need to experience Christ. Happy Feast Day to all of us who seek greater maturity of faith

growing up

growing up

Thomas was not doubting as much as seeking; he was expressing the desire of one who truly yearns for adult faith.

another way

another way

Surely the real mortality in our sin is not any particular action or omission itself, but what we do after we realise our sin

matariki

matariki

I have no doubt that God used the stars to shift my focus from my own failures and successes to the God I was seeking to follow.

a friend within

a friend within

Let’s learn both from Anton’s life and from John’s reflection to seek more passionately the ultimate relationship