paralympics and reason

Sep 6, 2012

Unfortunately I am not getting a chance to see too much of the London Paralympics.    

The exceptionally high TV ratings suggests that viewers are inspired and captivated by these athletes who have overcome disability to achieve excellence.

It is easy to forget that New Zealand, and the majority of the countries represented by these athletes, have laws that place these men and women on death-row…

…if their disability is discovered (or even suspected) In utero. 

Surely there is a lack of sound use of reason here?

Then this morning I read an article (‘facebook’ed by Brendan Malone) that really got me thinking.  Article at this link.  The piece is subtitled “It’s an appalling dilemma.”

I agree – it would be an appalling dilemma if I thought that the decision about the life or death of my disabled child was mine to make.  

The beauty of Catholic Faith gives an environment in which God has gifted us with freedom to make all the decisions that are (by divine design) human decisions, and to leave to God all the decisions that (by divine design) are God’s alone to make.

This is in no way an abdication of human responsibility. Instead, in this environment of faith, we are free from such appalling dilemmas.
Let’s be reasonable. Surely there is hypocrisy at play if I admire these disabled athletes for their achievements, while at the same time considering their disabilities as justification for abortion?
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