benevolence

Jan 10, 2014

This is the follow-up to yesterday’s post on guide books.  That reflection was inspired by Pope Francis suggesting that as pilgrims we have two “guide books” to help us on our way; the Bible, and creation. As I commented, most people are pretty good at reading scenery and animals as a communication about God. How often our minds and hearts are raised to God when we savour the lake and mountain vista, or when we marvel at whales surfacing then diving. We might even frame these images on the walls of our homes.

The challenge comes when we try to read the human person as a language that speaks of God. Sure, we might have images of family and friends in our living-room gallery, but the strangers in the mall and on the bus, each one of these people is created by God as the divine image, the ultimate in God’s creative activity, much more marvellous than any land or seascape.  Tragically we have become illiterate in this fundamental human language that is most central to our health and happiness.

However it is possible to re-learn this language. A few years ago I had the good fortune to be taught by Sister Mary Evelyn Jegen SND. She suggests a method for re-learning the language that the human person is. Mary Evelyn calls this method “Benevolent Glancing.” You might like to practice this. Tap on the image to read Mary Evelyn’s description of Benevolent Glancing.

JP Buddhist

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest Posts

so simple

so simple

These complications are very useful, and make the watch more… complicated.

get dressed

get dressed

This divine dressing is not a lengthy process needing skilled tailors and holy-wardrobe assistants.

sense-able ?

sense-able ?

With ears that are tuned to diverse frequencies I begin to delight in different dialects

tuning in

tuning in

If you saw a burning bush, would you (a) call 911, (b) get the hot dogs, or (c) recognise God?

Christ the King

Christ the King

Love casts out fear. But so do several other things — ignorance, alcohol, passion, presumption, and stupidity.