shepherd one

Sep 23, 2015

In a few minutes Pope Francis will walk on US soil for the first time after an inspiring few days in Cuba.

In his brief time in Cuba the pope addressed issues of oppression. The response to his words within Cuba was inspiringly positive and hopeful. Pope Francis’ faces a different kind of challenge in the US where the more subtle but equally oppressive power of capitalism reigns.

One of the media commentators have just said that while for most Americans the USA is the centre of the world, this is not the view of Pope Francis who, being a native of South America, views the USA with a degree of skepticism. It is significant that this is the first time Francis has set foot in the US. For Francis the “centre” is not a powerful country, but wherever an individual or community lives in relationship with Jesus Christ.

You can follow Pope Francis US visit live at the US bishops’ website at this link with a live stream of the key events at this link.

You will remember the moment in March 2013 at the time of Pope Francis first public appearance on the balcony above the entrance to St. Peter’s Basilica, the new pope bowed and asked us to pray God’s blessing upon him.

Let’s do the same now, and over the next few days. Every morning at St. Patrick’s High School in Timaru in the 1970’s the entire school prayed together for the pope in these words:

Let us pray for our Holy Father Pope Francis
May the Lord preserve him and give him life
and make him blessed upon the earth
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.
Amen.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest Posts

Ascension

Ascension

Most people think of the Ascension of Jesus as being a ‘departure’ moment. Jesus was here and now he is gone. We imagine Jesus going up into the clouds and the disciples waving farewell from below.
This is an unhelpful image.
It is essential that we understand what does happen and what does not happen in the Ascension event.
It would be easy to wrongly think that in his ministry showed us how to build the city of God on earth, and now he has gone and the mission is left to us.

touching the sacred

touching the sacred

A few years ago I was on Rēkohu Chatham Islands for what has become one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s most sacred days, the ANZAC day of remembrance in gratitude for those who gave their lives, their health, their youth, their service that we may live in peace.
The art above was produced by one of the students at the local Te One school.

every which way

every which way

A good number of Food For Faith readers have discovered one of the more recent FFF initiatives, the weekly Homily Studio.
The recording of this half-hour podcast is one of the highlights of my week.

in the room

in the room

Today’s reflection marks the end of the FFF Lent-to-Easter daily email posts. Thank you for your company on this journey.  While these daily posts (for those who have signed up for the Lent / Advent reflections at this link) will take a break until Advent, those who have signed up to receive every post or regular posts at this link.  You might take a moment now to visit this page now to check your email preferences.

During retreat this week I found myself pondering just how difficult it is to accept that God, in Jesus, is really with me today.

disciplined discipleship

disciplined discipleship

As I write I’m nearing the end of retreat days with a group of fifty priests from across the USA.  As I mentioned a couple of days ago the diversity and youth of the group is remarkable with the majority being aged under 40 and a good number ordained for fewer than five years.