Lectio Divina

Feb 27, 2021

Here is a 20 minute guided Lectio Divina reflection using the gospel reading for this weekend’s Second Sunday of Lent.

I had the opportunity this morning to lead a parish session on the prayer of Lectio Divina. Pope Francis is very helpful on the topic and his practical teaching is from his own experience, not only of good Jesuit formation but of sixty years of using this form of prayer in his daily life.

The passage below is from Francis’ teaching The Joy of the Gospel (Evangelii Gaudium) published in 2013.

There is one particular way of listening to what the Lord wishes to tell us in His Word and of letting ourselves be transformed by the Spirit. It is what we call lectio divina. It consists of reading God’s Word in a moment of prayer and allowing it to enlighten and renew us…

In the presence of God, during a recollected reading of the text, it is good to ask, for example: ‘Lord, what does this text say to me? What is it about my life that you want to change by this text? What troubles me about this text? Why am I not interested in this?’

Or perhaps: ‘What do I find pleasant in this text? What is it about this word that moves me? What attracts me? Why does it attract me?’

When we make an effort to listen to the Lord, temptations usually arise. One of them is simply to feel troubled or burdened, and to turn away.

Another common temptation is to think about what the text means for other people, and so avoid applying it to our own life. It can also happen that we look for excuses to water down the clear meaning of the text. Or we can wonder if God is demanding too much of us, asking for a decision which we are not yet prepared to make.

This leads many people to stop taking pleasure in the encounter with God’s Word; but this would mean forgetting that no one is more patient than God our Father, that no one is more understanding and willing to wait.

He always invites us to take a step forward, but does not demand a full response if we are not yet ready. He simply asks that we sincerely look at our life and present ourselves honestly before Him, and that we be willing to continue to grow, asking from Him what we ourselves cannot as yet achieve.

Evangelii Gaudium 152-153

6 Comments

  1. Fr. John, thank you. The assurance that Jesus is with us when we come down from the mountain top to the mess and uncertainty of our daily lives is powerful for me this morning.

    Reply
  2. Thank you Father John. By the end of the 20 minutes my resistance was diminished.

    Reply
  3. The bells make me think I am in church and with Christ and not just at my table. There is such peace.

    Reply
  4. Lovely Lectio thanks

    Reply
  5. Thank you Fr John for a challenging/soothing Lectio – just right for a Level 3 Sunday in Auckland!

    Reply
  6. Thank you for including Pope Francis’ teaching the Joy if the Gospel.
    Gives me hope to “hear” what I am listening to. A time of Peace.

    Reply

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